f.o. | withrow hat.

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This is, by far, one of my favorite finish off’s so far this year. I know we are only a few weeks into 2018, but I can already tell this hat is going to remain a favorite as I add to the f.o. catalog.

Withrow is a brilliant color work hat that’s featured in the new Cascades collection for Quince and Co. by Whitney Hayward. I decided to knit it exactly as the pattern called–with three skeins of Quince and Co. chickadee in the following colors: audouin, sabine, and delft.

I realized this hat was going to be far too tall after blocking for me (even though I love a tall hat, I’m not a huge fan of a slouchy look–it needs to really stand up if it has height) so I ripped back the decrease section at the top and modified it for a decrease every row. The only problem with this is that the top is a little more puckered than the original, but it fits like a dream after blocking and it doesn’t negatively alter the final look of the color work.

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As soon as I finished, I scooped up a handful of other colors of chickadee to try my hand at different palettes. I’m thinking grays, greens, and reds. Stay tuned.

I love the Cascades collection so much, I plan to knit everything in it, which is rare for me. I already purchased yarn for the Eugene color block pullover, and again, in the exact palette the pattern called for.

This collection is clearly shaping up to be a memorable favorite on my year–consider my need for blues and grays in my wardrobe high.

 

f.o. | stripes, again.

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These hats–they just never fail me! Here’s yet another Stripes Hat for the doc; I finally got to use some Blue Sky worsted hand dyes I had in my stash for years–so long, that this butterscotch colorway has since been discontinued. The worsted hand dyes is more aran weight than other yarns I’ve used for this hat, so I had to modify the amount of stripe repeats and go down a needle size. Despite that, it turned out nicely for doc’s big head and he said it fit comfortably.

The stripes are done in bits of Malabrigo merino worsted in black forest and Madelinetosh tosh vintage in the found pottery colorway. Finally, some speckled yarns. I’ve long desired to use these but never seem to find the right project (here’s is one that was perfect for speckles, and another).

I love that this was, yet another, complete stash busting project. And, what’s more, this pattern allows for endless stash busting and color combinations because you only need little bits for stripes, could make every stripe a different color if you wanted (there’s a new idea!) and the hat itself doesn’t make a significant dent into one skein, depending on yardage. Cheers to that.

read | challenge 2017.

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In 2017, I agreed to take on a Reading Challenge. I don’t normally participate in those kinds of things because I like to read what I want, when I want, but this one seemed interesting and reasonable and maybe a challenge is good for me.

The 2017 challenge prompted a read every two weeks or 24 books on the year in various categories, including a book translated from another language, one from childhood, one from school days, something more than 500 pages, a book that takes place somewhere you traveled that year…and on.

I started off slow–my first read was Tolstoy’s classic War and Peace, a 1300 page sweeping epic that actually took me well over 2 weeks to complete. And so, I got behind. I picked up steam in the summer, reading well more than a book every two weeks. But, still, it wasn’t enough to make up with starting a new job and picking a number of 500+ page novels.

I came really close. I missed completing the challenge by 5 books. And it prompted me to start a reading journal, in which I keep track of everything I read, when I read it, how long it took me, whether it was a library book, a kindle book, or a book I own, and some general musings on what I liked or didn’t like about it. I’m pleased it pushed me to really start keeping track of my reads in a unique way, and I’ll carry on.

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How do you keep track of the books you read? Do you at all? I never used to. And so, in this space, I’m going to also keep track of that process, too. Because this blog, while I hope I have a reader or two, has been a great long term companion to me, my makes, my likes, my pursuits.

See more (a sample) from my reading journal here. 

 

wip | waves.

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The past two weeks in the Boston area have been a blend of intense, deeply debilitating snowstorms, and–polar vortexes. Most days, the temperature hovered at 0 degrees, with a real feel well below.

So for that, we were stuck inside. A lot. And so, I baked bread and tackled charts. These Waves mittens by Tin can knits have been in my queue for awhile--featured in Making Vol. 3, Dots. I’m knitting the smallest size because I have tiny hands, hand knit mittens never fit me correctly, and a lot of knitters claimed these mittens were extra long.

The smallest size seems to be knitting up the right size for me, which I’m pleased about. I’ve finished the mitten gusset on one but put them down to work on a hat project when I can’t concentrate on complex charts.

Otherwise, these are shaping up to be a quick knit and a total stash buster–I’m using Knit Picks palette I had on hand in a blue and off white.

The recipe is Maida Heatter’s Mile High Cinnamon Bread from Food52.

What are you knitting–or baking– in the new year?

f.o. | karusellen.

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I’ve made this hat before and loved it. So, when you love something, go for it again, right? For some reason, while I love pom poms, I opted against one for these hats and am pleased with the end result.

Pattern is Karusellen by Erica Smith and this version is knit up using one skein each of Brooklyn Tweed Shelter in the fossil and almanac colorways. I’m pleased with the height this hat has–if you know me, you know I love a high hat.

See my project notes here. And more of my hats here.