f.o. | boot socks.

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The doc loves these boot socks from Purl Bee (and so do I!). I’ve made a couple pairs for him–they are perfectly bulky for those freezing, winter days. And because they are knit in worsted weight yarn, you can make a pair in one sitting, pretty much. Sometimes they take two days, but in the world of socks, that’s great timing.

The color combinations are endless and you can use scraps of yarn for the heels and toes–something I often have just enough of not to want to get rid of but not much else I can do with them. The doc lucks out–more boot socks.

I have since knit him a DK weight Madelinetosh version for Valentine’s Day; stay tuned for those.

These boot socks are knit using Malabrigo Rios in azul profundo for the main and little bits of Rios in glazed carrot for the heels and toes. He’s since worn them a pile and they still look killer.

See more of my boot socks here. Check out my ravelry project notes here.

f.o. | resist hat no. 1

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I have been eyeing this Resist Hat by Mild Woman for about a year–and the pattern was finally released last month. So of course, I dropped everything currently on the needles and knit this one up in a day.

The main color is Brooklyn Tweed Loft in soot and the color work is done with Madelinetosh Tosh Lite in gemini twins; both yarns I had laying around in my stash, so I’m psyched I was able to create this as a complete stash buster. This hat was actually gifted to the doc because the fit was a little large for my head; he has spent a lot of time in this hat over the course of the last month.

Since I completed this (fittingly on MLK Day), I have finished two more of these–one in light purples and one in mauves. Snaps of those to come, soon.

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This is definitely one of my favorite patterns so far this year. Knit one! See my ravelry notes here.

make | batik take two.

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A few years back, I somehow managed to teach a batik class to a bunch of reluctant middle school students even though I had no idea how to batik. And while I figured it out–and quickly–let the record show that just because you love making doesn’t mean you can just, poof!, make something in the ways its intended.

I recently had the opportunity to become a “student” of a batik. I thought it would be a great opportunity to revisit this craft not as teacher who had no idea what she was doing, but as passenger seat learner. Instead of using hot wax, we used glue. I thought it wouldn’t work; I couldn’t get fine detail–something I had trouble with using wax and paint brushes.

Stay tuned for finished results.