B L O G

f.o. | camilla babe.

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I have been wanting to knit a Camilla Babe by Carrie Bostick Hoge for awhile now–but everyone I would knit for with child had boys or live in deserts, and while I’m very much anti gender specific colors or clothes, this feather and fan lace detail on the front, no matter in what yarn, felt too feminine for me to pull off for any babe but girl.

And then a colleague with child told me she was having a girl. But, I’d already knit her some booties, a hat, and a little striped t shirt sweater since its a July baby. While sitting around avoiding a project that’s languished, I looked at the skeins of Madelinetosh Tosh Vintage in the Filtered Light colorway I had laying around, and boom, I started knitting the Camilla Babe, a Madder Root pattern.

It took two evenings to finish this sweater–the 3 months size–and it lives up to every idea I had about how it would look. The pattern is so easy to memorize; I’m thinking of making one for myself.

And so, that colleague, will get an extra special bonus hand knit. Maybe she will think I’m crazy?

process |shop.

shop_logo_bigI had an etsy shop years back–almost ten years back! I wasn’t at a time or space to really grow that shop or make it work. So, it closed.

Lately, I’ve been thinking about certain aspects of my making–some of which I’d like to share with the world.  I’ve also got nearly a month and a half this summer, between jobs–a perfect time to explore some of this.

And so, I’m in the process of reopening my shop. To start, it will simply feature some of the jewelry I make; there will be ready to wear pieces, as well as some optional custom beading options.

Eventually, I’d like to feature a few other items, like screen printed t-shirts.

Will you buy? Stay tuned.

f.o. | purl soho baby sweater.

34478319170_356d65be03_cFor a colleague’s impending girl. I loved knitting this one. The details were so interesting and the construction was impeccable.

The Little Baby Sweater by Purl Soho is knit from the bottom up, you create a squared set it sleeve later using pick ups and cable cast ons–so fun! I’ve never knit a sweater this way, and I can imagine it’d be pretty cool for an adult t shirt as well.

I wanted to create another stash buster; and even though I’m partial to superwash wools for babies, I had two skeins of Knit Picks Palette in the cream and charcoal colorways, which was just perfect for the pattern. I also used tiny, pale yellow buttons from my button bag as well.

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You can see more snaps here. And visit my ravelry project page here.

baby knits | purl soho essentials.

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I adore Purl Soho patterns–particularly their baby knits, which I’ve made a million times over for the impending bundles in my life.

I can’t tell you how many pairs of baby mocs I’ve made–and I always gift them with the garter ear flap hat because I think they go nicely together and can be knit up in complimentary colors.

This time around, I knew my colleague was having a girl; but knowing she will likely have another child in the future, coupled with the fact I dislike gender expected garments, and that she doesn’t appear particularly “girly” to me (whatever that means), I thought she’d appreciate something less than pink. Or purple. Or pale green. A lot of pale green is used for girls these days to feel less gender specific.

Instead, I went with off whites, grays, and dark blues. I really like the result.

My only mod was on the garter ear flap hat–I did striping in the reverse stockinette at the crown, and instead of a tassel top (which I’ve made before), I decided to use the remaining six stitches as an i-cord to make a top knot. The i-cord was about 3 inches long and then after BO, I knotted it up. I love the modification.

These were knit up using little bits in my stash leftover from other projects (win!), including Juniper Moon Farm Moonshine in flan, and bits of Madelinetosh Tosh Vintage in whiskers, flycatcher blue, and composition book gray.

Its recipient was quite grateful, which makes all this handmade stuff worth it. To provide unique items and to show your care, in some small way, is invaluable to my making process.

wip | merrifield.

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I love Pam Allen’s patterns for Quince and Co. They are always beautiful and have small details–like Merrifield, which features a square neckline and the use of slipped stitches to create cool cables.

This was such a fast knit. I don’t know why it was finished in just a handful of days and not any marathon knit sessions. But I think it’s shape, drape, and boxier fit will be perfect on my petite frame. The kestrel yarn grows with wear, so I’m excited to see how the finished product looks.

All it needs is blocking. I didn’t make any mods, knit the second smallest size because I’ve used kestrel for garments before and find that it grows and my frame (particularly my torso) is very petite, and used the same color way as the sample–urchin. I think, of the three color ways I’ve used before, this is by far my favorite.

Finished snaps, soon.

cook | beef ramen.

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This entire spring has been relatively cold and rainy. Day in, day out. We need the rain, but it leaves me is quite a funk. Some of the only creative outlets I’ve had in this weather are in the kitchen.

And so, when it poured and poured last week, and the idea of walking and getting drenched to get a bowl of much needed ramen presented itself, I opted to try to make it at home for the first time. And while it certainly is a bit nontraditional, it tasted amazing and was just what was needed. Dare I say, too, it was one of the easier meals I’ve made in awhile.

Here’s how I did it.

I sauteed some diced onion, garlic, carrot, celery, and fresh ginger in a stock pot with olive oil. I added sriracha and a few tablespoons of miso paste (I feel like this was an essential ingredient) to the mix and then dumped two cups of beef broth and two cups of chicken broth into that mixture. From there, I added a few dashes of soy sauce, and let it simmer on the stove for about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, I boiled some water for two six minute eggs (yes, boil for six minutes and they are perfect for ramen) and salt and pepper two filets for the grill. I wanted super tender beef and I wanted it to be rare, so for me, grilling it off for a few minutes on each side and then slicing it for the top of our ramen made the most sense.

While the eggs were cooking, I added the enoki mushrooms to the simmering broth and a handful of fresh chopped cilantro. I diced up some green onion, more cilantro, and very thinly sliced some jalapenos as fresh toppings. I quickly cooked the ramen noodles (one for each person, discard seasoning packet) in the broth, then spooned it all into ramen bowls and topped with egg, steak, fresh herbs and veggies, and slurped my way to happiness.

Let me know if you try this–and any variations you would suggest.

sew | summer shirts.

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I desperately want to get better at sewing. It never happens, mostly because I don’t have a sewing machine. And so, my mum takes me down to her studio every once in awhile to give me a lesson. But, I get lazy sometimes, and don’t want to work on my projects. I’d rather just hang out.

And I’m shit at it, so I avoid it.

This summer, I have a goal to at least become a little better at sewing–maybe enough so to warrant my own basic machine someday. I’ll be off from work, and have the time, I tell myself. Evenings could be spent tooling around, rather than watching t.v. or falling asleep early. I can’t sacrifice my outside during the day time, but here’s a way to get it in.

I’ve decided Grainline Studio‘s Scout Tee and Willow Tank are two easy patterns that I could get some reward from and I could wear these in the summer, and likely, to work, in the fall and spring. Plus, I love everything Jen at Grainline does–from sewing, to knitting, and beyond. It’s inspiring. Her work is amazing–aspirational, in fact.

What are you sewing? What would you recommend I try?

cook | cod + lemony spinach.

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This is a really simple, healthy weeknight meal. The baked cod, wrapped in prosciutto for a little bit of necessary fat, is smothered in salt, pepper, olive oil and baked until white and flaky, about 10-12 minutes in a 350 degree oven.

I sauteed some onion, garlic, and spinach in a pan, and squeezed fresh lemon juice and zest all over the top at the end of cooking, then served this entire dish with Israeli couscous scented with garlic and toasted sliced almonds.

Try something like this; you won’t regret it.

make | hand painted necklaces.

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I love trying new things. As part of my recent and burgeoning studio practice, I started painting a whole host of beads without any idea where it was going.

And then, I hit the spray studio. And then, I remembered I had antiqued leather and linen yarn in my stash.

Eventually, these necklaces were born. I’ve worn the left two every day since I made them; I gifted the turquoise and silver one to my friend and studio mate, Rebecca. She just so happened to be wearing the perfect handmade tank top that morning, like it was kismet.

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I’m even getting so obsessive about this particular practice, that I might considering selling these, if I think there is interested buyers out there. What do you think? Would you wear something like this by me?

As part of the kick off to Me Made May, today, I sport one of these necklaces. It’s not clothing, but its handmade jewelry. Does that count?