wip: skiff hat.

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I finally cast on (and finished!) the Skiff Hat. I used Brooklyn Tweed Shelter, as the pattern calls for, in the artifact color way. It’s a deep forest green and I love it.

Since finishing, I haven’t yet snapped it or worn it because I wonder if it’s too large for my head. Does it overtake me? Anyone else knit this and experience that? I did the watchcap version, not the beanie.

No pom for me, on this one. And I also went down two needle sizes, per some of the recommendations on ravelry, and I can’t imagine how off my gauge would have been if I knit this with the size needles the pattern suggested. The tubular cast on for this pattern was beautiful, too.

Finished snaps, soon.

wip: snoqualmie cardigan.

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It’s been slow going, for some reason, on my Snoqualmie Cardigan by Michelle Wang. I’ve found even though the cables are easy to memorize and not technically difficult, if I can’t concentrate, I make silly errors, or my brain can’t memorize the sequence I’m on. Maybe it’s just where I’m at right now; so despite casting on awhile ago, I’m still working on the back section.

Sigh.

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I will make progress in the coming weeks; I have to set this goal for myself.

Here are some progress shots of where I am at. I haven’t made enough of a dent in this project to know whether I’ll actually like the finished project.

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More to come, hopefully, on this one, in the next few weeks.

wip | (yet another) resist hat.

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I love these Resist hats. I’ve knit four of them already–so why not a fifth? This one is knit using Quince and Co. Finch in sabine for the main color and canvas for the contrasting.

This hat knits up really quick, so if you’re looking for some handmade holiday items as we wind down, this one is it. This is the first time I’ve used Finch for this hat–and it’s so worth it; the Resist is much stronger, clearer, and more dynamic and I think it’s the yarn choice.

See more of my Resist hats, here.

 

wip | turtle dove sweater.

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This is my first time using a Woolfolk yarn, even though my sweater club has been sitting in a box waiting for me about half a year now (and it’s filled with Woolfolk yarn).

I’m currently rounding the finish line on the Turtle Dove sweater by Espace Tricot using Woolfolk Luft bulky yarn, in the blacks color way. This yarn is so ridiculously soft and it has a bit of a halo. I love it.

The Turtle Dove sweater is a dream of a pattern; super fast, easy to read, and the Woolfolk Luft is a perfect yarn for the project. I can’t wait to wear it; I have but one sleeve left. Here’s to hoping the dolman style sleeve doesn’t make me look like a fool.

 

f.o. | eugene pullover.

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I’ve been addicted to the Cascades collection by Whitney Hayward since it was released. I’ve even knit more than one Withrow hat from it. I’d love to have every one of these items in my wardrobe.

I bought the yarn for the Eugene pullover about a year ago, but finally cast on for this sweater at the bitter end of summer. It didn’t take long to knit the body, and then I let the sleeves languish for a few weeks in favor of a hat project, a sock project, and finishing the Ramona Light cardigan.

And then yesterday, I finally finished the sleeves and the neckline. I actually really love it. The shape is short and boxy pre-blocking but still fits well. I think a good soak will get it right to the specs I’m hoping for. I could have knit this on 8s instead of the recommended 9s because my gauge was ever so slightly off, but I’m loving the fit anyways–I don’t think there was drastic impact like I anticipated when I finally noticed after nearly completing the body (gah!).

Cheers to finishing projects and feeling great about them, though I may ultimately gift this one to my mum. Next up in this collection I’d like to knit the Rainier pullover and the Holden wrap.

Finished snaps, soon. What are you finishing this fall?

My project notes are here.

wip | ramona light cardigan.

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For some reason, this has been on the needles since 2017. I knit nearly 70 percent of it in a fury, in less than a week. And then, instead of immediately picking up the sleeve stitches and carrying on, I let it languish for more than a year.

Until now.

I finally finished this Ramona Light Cardigan by Elizabeth Smith this week. It feels great. And I really love the fit and the color, still. This often never happens when I knit a sweater, especially one that I wait so so long to complete.

The buttons I think will work, I’m not entirely sure of yet, but finished snaps of this one, hopefully, at the weekend.

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This lighter version of the original Ramona Cardigan was knit up in Quince and Co. Chickadee in the honey color way. It’s a dream; the loft of the yarn is beautiful and it’s buttery soft. Plus this sweater looks a bit green-ish, a bit tan-ish, a bit yellow, depending on the light, and I love that.

What’s a project you left on the needles forever?

See more from my knitting sketchbook here. Read my project notes for the sweater here.

knit | road trip.

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I just returned from two weeks on the road, camping. I brought with me four skeins of Quince and Co. Sparrow in the rille colorway (a salt and pepper marl yarn) for a Purl Bee Notched Hem tanktop.

And while I’m rounding the finish line already on this garment, I mostly read on the trip. In fact, I’m also rounding the finish line to Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy and I started it just about two weeks ago.

Hurrah for accomplishments, knit and small, big Russian literature and short memoir.

What are you knitting? Reading?

wip | python.

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O.k. Let’s talk about the Python Shawl. My obsession with the endless color combinations and the ability to color block this in tones has really intrigued me for a few months. So, I finally bought some soon to be discontinued Madelinetosh sport in tones of gray with a pop of clay, and boom here we are.

However, section 4 is throwing me for a loop. Listen, I consider myself a pretty expert knitter; but for some reason, section 4 is beating me. I’ve pulled it out twice. It’s a straight forward set of instructions for German short rows. But for some reason, I am not creating a triangle. I’m creating a kind of triangle, where one side, which is suppose to be the point of the triangle, is just coming out larger and less pointy, hence it’s not even a triangle. I have never had this trouble. What am I missing? I’ve racked my brain. I’m assuming its something in my interpretation of the repeats that I’m just straight up missing and its obvious and right in front of me.

This is, in my mind, a simple garter shawl pattern. I’ve created triangle shawls before. What the heck gives? Is it my brain space for knitting right now? Is there something in the German short rows that are owning me? NO ONE, seriously, NO ONE, on ravelry has mentioned any difficulty–errata in the pattern was for the next section, and everyone else’s look PERFECT.

I have resorted to writing to the pattern designer, Emilia Jensen, (a perk of ravelry and its power in the making community) and am embarrassed by asking–she responded right away and I can’t blame her for having little advice for me. I wouldn’t have advice for me, either.

Has this happened to you? Where you have pattern block for one part? Where it seems simple but you can’t get it down even if you consider yourself pretty much an expert? Expert I am not, right now.

Ripping back for a second time. And wondering what I got myself into, since I barely–if ever–wear the scarves I knit, or any scarves at all, these days.

wip | waves.

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The past two weeks in the Boston area have been a blend of intense, deeply debilitating snowstorms, and–polar vortexes. Most days, the temperature hovered at 0 degrees, with a real feel well below.

So for that, we were stuck inside. A lot. And so, I baked bread and tackled charts. These Waves mittens by Tin can knits have been in my queue for awhile--featured in Making Vol. 3, Dots. I’m knitting the smallest size because I have tiny hands, hand knit mittens never fit me correctly, and a lot of knitters claimed these mittens were extra long.

The smallest size seems to be knitting up the right size for me, which I’m pleased about. I’ve finished the mitten gusset on one but put them down to work on a hat project when I can’t concentrate on complex charts.

Otherwise, these are shaping up to be a quick knit and a total stash buster–I’m using Knit Picks palette I had on hand in a blue and off white.

The recipe is Maida Heatter’s Mile High Cinnamon Bread from Food52.

What are you knitting–or baking– in the new year?

wip | first rug

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Recently, I found myself trying something new: punch needle rug hooking. It’s pretty amazing. After a few small, freeform rugs about 2 inches by 2 inches, I decided to dive into this much bigger 18 inch circular design.

I could envision this being the covering for a cool, round stool, or something similar. But in actuality, this will likely just be another practice piece. With the holidays coming, I have an idea for some cool hooked rug pillows to gift.

This piece is worked up on monk’s cloth using a bulky weight yarn and a Amy Oxford punch needle #10. You can purchase these incredible punch needles here–but be prepared to wait. Apparently the rug hooking craze is here and Oxford punch needles are in high demand.

What new makes have you tried?

wip | striped.

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I decided I wanted to make myself a basic charcoal and white striped sweater. I’ve made a version of the Tea and Jam and Bread sweater before, loved the fit but ultimately gifted it to my mum, and decided I wanted a version for myself.

The thing I love about this sweater is it can be manipulated easily. While the original calls for two larger stripes in different colors and front pockets, I’ve seen a million different versions of this one: from solid and no pockets to mini stripes and beyond. And so, since I knew I loved its shape and fit, I decided to use it as the basis for this new sweater.

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I’m nearly to the finish line on the body in under a week. My stripes are approximately 2.25 inches or 13 rows in Brooklyn Tweed Shelter with size 7 needles. I love the neck shaping on this sweater, as well. If you aren’t a fan of short rows, this may not be the pattern for you–but believe me, they are worth it in the overall fit of the sweater.

Of course, I’m using one of my favorite yarns: Brooklyn Tweed Shelter. The colors are cast iron and fossil.

Finished product soon.