wip: snoqualmie cardigan.

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It’s been slow going, for some reason, on my Snoqualmie Cardigan by Michelle Wang. I’ve found even though the cables are easy to memorize and not technically difficult, if I can’t concentrate, I make silly errors, or my brain can’t memorize the sequence I’m on. Maybe it’s just where I’m at right now; so despite casting on awhile ago, I’m still working on the back section.

Sigh.

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I will make progress in the coming weeks; I have to set this goal for myself.

Here are some progress shots of where I am at. I haven’t made enough of a dent in this project to know whether I’ll actually like the finished project.

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More to come, hopefully, on this one, in the next few weeks.

f.o. | eugene pullover.

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Despite my gauge being a little off on this one (and not discovering this until after I divided for the sleeves and didn’t want to rip the entire thing out), I’m really happy with the finished product and the fit of the sweater.

Eugene is so comfortable; I might gift this one for the holidays this season because despite loving it, I’m not sure I’ll wear it. I’d consider using this pattern again with different striping or even just a solid pullover.

The Eugene pullover by Whitney Hayward is part of the brilliant Cascades Collection. It’s knit up using three colors of Quince and Co. lark in glacier, bird’s egg, and slate.

You can read my project notes here. And you can see more of my sweaters here.

f.o. | eugene pullover.

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I’ve been addicted to the Cascades collection by Whitney Hayward since it was released. I’ve even knit more than one Withrow hat from it. I’d love to have every one of these items in my wardrobe.

I bought the yarn for the Eugene pullover about a year ago, but finally cast on for this sweater at the bitter end of summer. It didn’t take long to knit the body, and then I let the sleeves languish for a few weeks in favor of a hat project, a sock project, and finishing the Ramona Light cardigan.

And then yesterday, I finally finished the sleeves and the neckline. I actually really love it. The shape is short and boxy pre-blocking but still fits well. I think a good soak will get it right to the specs I’m hoping for. I could have knit this on 8s instead of the recommended 9s because my gauge was ever so slightly off, but I’m loving the fit anyways–I don’t think there was drastic impact like I anticipated when I finally noticed after nearly completing the body (gah!).

Cheers to finishing projects and feeling great about them, though I may ultimately gift this one to my mum. Next up in this collection I’d like to knit the Rainier pullover and the Holden wrap.

Finished snaps, soon. What are you finishing this fall?

My project notes are here.

f.o. | ramona light cardigan.

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It’s been nearly two years, but I finally finished my Ramona Light cardigan. This one fits like a dream even if I used buttons that may be slightly on the too small size.

The Ramona Light is knit up in Quince and Co. chickadee in the honey colorway; the fabric is light and dreamy. I love it.

My only modification to this pattern was to avoid any waist shaping for a boxier fit. Here is a snap of it before blocking.

It also feels good to say I don’t have any projects languishing on the needles from the last calendar year; I have but one or two items from years prior that have been in a box that I just don’t know what to do with yet. Will I finish them? Frog them? I can’t make that decision yet. Still, my focus on getting things on and off the needles without having a million projects going appears to be working, and at ground zero no less.

See my pattern notes here.

 

wip | ramona light cardigan.

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For some reason, this has been on the needles since 2017. I knit nearly 70 percent of it in a fury, in less than a week. And then, instead of immediately picking up the sleeve stitches and carrying on, I let it languish for more than a year.

Until now.

I finally finished this Ramona Light Cardigan by Elizabeth Smith this week. It feels great. And I really love the fit and the color, still. This often never happens when I knit a sweater, especially one that I wait so so long to complete.

The buttons I think will work, I’m not entirely sure of yet, but finished snaps of this one, hopefully, at the weekend.

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This lighter version of the original Ramona Cardigan was knit up in Quince and Co. Chickadee in the honey color way. It’s a dream; the loft of the yarn is beautiful and it’s buttery soft. Plus this sweater looks a bit green-ish, a bit tan-ish, a bit yellow, depending on the light, and I love that.

What’s a project you left on the needles forever?

See more from my knitting sketchbook here. Read my project notes for the sweater here.

knit | notch hem tank.

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Another tank top? In linen yarn? Why, yes! It’s summer, after all. This is Purl Soho’s Notched Hem Tank and I love it.

I knit this using Quince and Co. sparrow in the new salt and pepper marle color way called rille. And it’s a dream. I love the details on the side of the tank that create some visual interest and contrasting texture. Plus, it’s a perfect fit.

I haven’t actually worn it anywhere yet despite finishing it in April, but now that we are finally in the throws of summer weather, I should break it out.

You can read my project notes here. And check out more photos of the tank here.

knit | kai tank.

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I’m on a linen yarn kick and I love making tank tops. This summer seemed to take forever to get here; and so while I begged for warmer skies this spring, I knit up a Kai Tank top using Quince and Co. kestrel linen yarn in the graphite color way.

The only modifications I made was to not do the color block contrasting color at the bottom and I ripped out the neck edging because for some reason, I couldn’t get the tank top over my head with it! I made size two and my gauge was spot on–so I don’t know why my edge was so tight and didn’t work. Luckily, I think it’s ok without it.

This is the second linen tank I’ve made this year–both bottom up designs with nice split hems, which I think are really flattering. You can get more details about my project here.

f.o. | withrow hat.

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This is, by far, one of my favorite finish off’s so far this year. I know we are only a few weeks into 2018, but I can already tell this hat is going to remain a favorite as I add to the f.o. catalog.

Withrow is a brilliant color work hat that’s featured in the new Cascades collection for Quince and Co. by Whitney Hayward. I decided to knit it exactly as the pattern called–with three skeins of Quince and Co. chickadee in the following colors: audouin, sabine, and delft.

I realized this hat was going to be far too tall after blocking for me (even though I love a tall hat, I’m not a huge fan of a slouchy look–it needs to really stand up if it has height) so I ripped back the decrease section at the top and modified it for a decrease every row. The only problem with this is that the top is a little more puckered than the original, but it fits like a dream after blocking and it doesn’t negatively alter the final look of the color work.

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As soon as I finished, I scooped up a handful of other colors of chickadee to try my hand at different palettes. I’m thinking grays, greens, and reds. Stay tuned.

I love the Cascades collection so much, I plan to knit everything in it, which is rare for me. I already purchased yarn for the Eugene color block pullover, and again, in the exact palette the pattern called for.

This collection is clearly shaping up to be a memorable favorite on my year–consider my need for blues and grays in my wardrobe high.

 

f.o. | striped hats.

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The Striped Hats pattern by Quince and Co. is for sure my favorite pattern this winter. It’s simple, easy to memorize so the project is good for travel or knitting in public, and they knit up in a day or two. Plus, the color combinations are endless and you don’t need large amounts of wool to create these–perfect for stash busting, particularly those small partial skeins from other projects to use in the small stripes sections.

The doc asked for a couple brighter hats—most of the ones I have knit for him through the years are gray, dark charcoal, forest green, red. He was looking for purples, oranges, turquoise.

And lucky for him, because these projects are so speedy, he has two new hats at the ready.

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The purple one is knit using Malabrigo Merino Worsted in periwinkle as the main color, some small bits in indigo and tiger lily, respectively.

The green version features Brooklyn Tweed Shelter, main color in sap, and contrasting stripes in cast iron and sweatshirt.

Both of these hats are complete stash busters! I’ve already made a few more of these since. They will be gifted to everyone in my family this holiday season, and I now have two versions for myself. Don’t expect to see me wearing any other hats this winter–the fit of the rolled brim is a dream.

See my ravelry notes here.

f.o. | striped hat.

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Back in 2013, I bought several skeins of Quince and Co. lark for their Striped Hat pattern. For some reason, they went in one of my stash bins to languish for four years.

I have no idea why this project got away from me for so long. Usually, in these cases, I rediscover the yarn years later, cannot for the life of me remember what I purchased it for, and repurpose the skeins into something else.

This pattern must have really stuck out in my mind because I rediscovered the yarn the other night and immediately dug out the pattern I had already purchased. This hat knits up so fast and the fit is like a dream. I love the rolled, turned in brim and its interesting construction.

My only modification was to do one less of the final row 1 -7 repeats. I thought the hat would be too tall if I didn’t make the slight adjustment. The height is perfect with the modification and it’s the only one I’ve been wearing since I completed it last weekend.

The pattern uses four skeins of Quince and Co. lark; I used the same color ways as the pattern called for: honey, frank’s plum, and gingerbread. I had mere yards of the main color (honey) left over because I didn’t complete all the pattern repeats, which means I have enough leftover to make another hat.

Read my project notes here. Expect to see a whole bunch more of these hats in my winter making this year; the color combinations are endless.

wear | merrifield sweater.

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I finished my Merrifield Sweater by Pam Allen back in May, and today is the first time I’m actually wearing it out in the world (to my job). I’m loving the fit, which is unusual for me–usually, I never wear my hand knit sweaters because the sleeves are too long, or too short, or the body is too long, or the yoke feels like it doesn’t sit so nice.

This one, this one feels like a dream. I’m glad I knit it in one of the smallest sizes, because ultimately I think my frame is more petite than I feel in my mind.

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This was knit up using Quince and Co. kestrel yarn (linen) in urchin and is a perfect sweater for this weird October weather we are having–chilly mornings, mid 70s afternoons.

See my project notes here.

wip | merrifield.

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I love Pam Allen’s patterns for Quince and Co. They are always beautiful and have small details–like Merrifield, which features a square neckline and the use of slipped stitches to create cool cables.

This was such a fast knit. I don’t know why it was finished in just a handful of days and not any marathon knit sessions. But I think it’s shape, drape, and boxier fit will be perfect on my petite frame. The kestrel yarn grows with wear, so I’m excited to see how the finished product looks.

All it needs is blocking. I didn’t make any mods, knit the second smallest size because I’ve used kestrel for garments before and find that it grows and my frame (particularly my torso) is very petite, and used the same color way as the sample–urchin. I think, of the three color ways I’ve used before, this is by far my favorite.

Finished snaps, soon.