wip: snoqualmie cardigan.

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This sweater is quite the labor of love. I keep picking it up and putting it down, which is why it’s taking me so long (more than 6 months! but I’ve made a bunch of stuff in between).

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The Snoqualmie has been on my list for quite some time. I know I will cherish this when its complete (so long as I’m happy with my seaming and the overall fit). I’m knitting mine up in a different fiber than called for–Quince and Co. Osprey in the Audouin color way. It’s gorgeous and the drape so far really holds up the cables well.

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I followed an amazing modification for a drop front pocket on either front panel and I’m loving the construction of it so far. I’m hoping I didn’t create too much bulk in the front and I won’t love the way it falls on me when I’m finished, but fingers crossed.

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This entire project has been a lovely process. I’ve learned some new techniques, for sure, and this is my first sweater with entirely all over cable. I’m really pleased, so far, with the results. That’s probably because I swatched this one real good.

It’s been resting while I work on a Ripple Crop Top and a Bouquet Sweater, but my goal is to have this finished by the end of October.

yarn: harrisville nightshades.

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Calling the hive mind! Tons of folks are obsessing over Harrisville Designs new line, Night Shades, and I am indeed one of them. I recently scored 5 skeins (a sweaters quantity, approximately) in the static color way, which has little flecks of white in the dark tones. I’m in love.

But now, what to make with it? I keep going back and forth but I’m looking for a sweater pattern that calls for DK weight yarn and isn’t tunic style (I don’t have enough for that!). Any ideas?

I thought about a pattern from the Night Shades collection by Whitney Hayward–the sable pullover in particular–but I just don’t know.

Help.

wip: snoqualmie cardigan.

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It’s been slow going, for some reason, on my Snoqualmie Cardigan by Michelle Wang. I’ve found even though the cables are easy to memorize and not technically difficult, if I can’t concentrate, I make silly errors, or my brain can’t memorize the sequence I’m on. Maybe it’s just where I’m at right now; so despite casting on awhile ago, I’m still working on the back section.

Sigh.

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I will make progress in the coming weeks; I have to set this goal for myself.

Here are some progress shots of where I am at. I haven’t made enough of a dent in this project to know whether I’ll actually like the finished project.

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More to come, hopefully, on this one, in the next few weeks.

swatch: snoqualmie cardigan.

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I finally did it. In 2019, I swatched. I swatched this gorgeous baby for my Snoqualmie Cardigan by Michelle Wang (who is a genius, imho), which has been on my list to knit forever.

And in 2019, one of my knitting goals was to swatch. And to swatch regularly for sweaters. I’m so bad about this; and I’m thrilled to be turning over a new leaf to less giving it up to chance and more the perfect fit.

This sweater is slow going because I haven’t had time to concentrate on it. But, it will get some love this weekend, I think.

I’m knitting it in Quince and Co. Osprey in the audouin color; I saw others knit it up with this yarn and I loved the drape on their garments.

Fingers crossed this seamed, robust cabled cardigan is everything I hope for this year.

f.o. | turtle dove sweater.

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I finally took some snaps of myself wearing my Turtle Dove Sweater by Espace Tricot and for once, I think I’m in love and might wear this one regularly.

It fits like a dream. This is knit up using Woolfolk Luft yarn in the 6L (blacks) colorway; this is my first time using this yarn, and let me tell you, the drape on this! Plus, it’s so soft, and has a slight haze to it. Gorgeous.

You can read my project notes here.  I’m definitely thinking there are more sweaters in this particular yarn in my future.

wip | turtle dove sweater.

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This is my first time using a Woolfolk yarn, even though my sweater club has been sitting in a box waiting for me about half a year now (and it’s filled with Woolfolk yarn).

I’m currently rounding the finish line on the Turtle Dove sweater by Espace Tricot using Woolfolk Luft bulky yarn, in the blacks color way. This yarn is so ridiculously soft and it has a bit of a halo. I love it.

The Turtle Dove sweater is a dream of a pattern; super fast, easy to read, and the Woolfolk Luft is a perfect yarn for the project. I can’t wait to wear it; I have but one sleeve left. Here’s to hoping the dolman style sleeve doesn’t make me look like a fool.

 

f.o. | eugene pullover.

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Despite my gauge being a little off on this one (and not discovering this until after I divided for the sleeves and didn’t want to rip the entire thing out), I’m really happy with the finished product and the fit of the sweater.

Eugene is so comfortable; I might gift this one for the holidays this season because despite loving it, I’m not sure I’ll wear it. I’d consider using this pattern again with different striping or even just a solid pullover.

The Eugene pullover by Whitney Hayward is part of the brilliant Cascades Collection. It’s knit up using three colors of Quince and Co. lark in glacier, bird’s egg, and slate.

You can read my project notes here. And you can see more of my sweaters here.

f.o. | eugene pullover.

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I’ve been addicted to the Cascades collection by Whitney Hayward since it was released. I’ve even knit more than one Withrow hat from it. I’d love to have every one of these items in my wardrobe.

I bought the yarn for the Eugene pullover about a year ago, but finally cast on for this sweater at the bitter end of summer. It didn’t take long to knit the body, and then I let the sleeves languish for a few weeks in favor of a hat project, a sock project, and finishing the Ramona Light cardigan.

And then yesterday, I finally finished the sleeves and the neckline. I actually really love it. The shape is short and boxy pre-blocking but still fits well. I think a good soak will get it right to the specs I’m hoping for. I could have knit this on 8s instead of the recommended 9s because my gauge was ever so slightly off, but I’m loving the fit anyways–I don’t think there was drastic impact like I anticipated when I finally noticed after nearly completing the body (gah!).

Cheers to finishing projects and feeling great about them, though I may ultimately gift this one to my mum. Next up in this collection I’d like to knit the Rainier pullover and the Holden wrap.

Finished snaps, soon. What are you finishing this fall?

My project notes are here.

f.o. | ramona light cardigan.

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It’s been nearly two years, but I finally finished my Ramona Light cardigan. This one fits like a dream even if I used buttons that may be slightly on the too small size.

The Ramona Light is knit up in Quince and Co. chickadee in the honey colorway; the fabric is light and dreamy. I love it.

My only modification to this pattern was to avoid any waist shaping for a boxier fit. Here is a snap of it before blocking.

It also feels good to say I don’t have any projects languishing on the needles from the last calendar year; I have but one or two items from years prior that have been in a box that I just don’t know what to do with yet. Will I finish them? Frog them? I can’t make that decision yet. Still, my focus on getting things on and off the needles without having a million projects going appears to be working, and at ground zero no less.

See my pattern notes here.

 

wip | ramona light cardigan.

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For some reason, this has been on the needles since 2017. I knit nearly 70 percent of it in a fury, in less than a week. And then, instead of immediately picking up the sleeve stitches and carrying on, I let it languish for more than a year.

Until now.

I finally finished this Ramona Light Cardigan by Elizabeth Smith this week. It feels great. And I really love the fit and the color, still. This often never happens when I knit a sweater, especially one that I wait so so long to complete.

The buttons I think will work, I’m not entirely sure of yet, but finished snaps of this one, hopefully, at the weekend.

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This lighter version of the original Ramona Cardigan was knit up in Quince and Co. Chickadee in the honey color way. It’s a dream; the loft of the yarn is beautiful and it’s buttery soft. Plus this sweater looks a bit green-ish, a bit tan-ish, a bit yellow, depending on the light, and I love that.

What’s a project you left on the needles forever?

See more from my knitting sketchbook here. Read my project notes for the sweater here.

knitting | scrappy flax sweaters.

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My sister in law loves a matching outfit on her three boys. I usually knit them all the same pattern and add personal flair for each of them (my oldest nephew, Tyler, loves yellows and greens; my middle nephew, Ryan, likes pink and orange; and my youngest nephew, Grant, likes anything you put on him at this point).

Enter their Christmas presents this year–scrappy Flax sweaters. This is my first time knitting this pattern and I have no idea what I was waiting for. It’s simple but has some interesting details to keep you entertaining, and unending sizing in good chunks for little kids so that my nephews can wear these this winter, but also grow into them further (win, win!).

I have loads of bits and ends of really super yarns like Madelinetosh Tosh Vintage and Malabrigo Rios (oh, I can’t forget the TINY bit of Tanis Fiber Arts) laying around and figured I could use them up if I made these Flax sweaters in bold stripes. Plus, if you can’t wear a yellow and pink sweater at 3 years old, when can you?

I did make a little mistake on my oldest nephew’s version–I didn’t leave the center sleeve stitches in garter stitch, instead somehow managing to use it all the way around the sleeve stitches. Whoops. The knitting hive mind has assured me it’s a small detail and no one will notice; I couldn’t for the life of me figure out how to rip back when I didn’t notice this mistake until I’d basically finished the body.

At least his will be most unique, right?

The yarn is the aforementioned in colors like espadrilles, copper penny, frank ochre, azul profundo, yerba, lettuce, glazed carrots, and chris gray. It was the perfect use for a bunch of scraps in my stash.

Here’s to hoping my nephews love them. Finished snaps, soon.

knit | scrappy sweaters.

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I always have a ton of odds and ends from various projects–little bits of really nice yarns that I can’t bear to throw out and don’t know what to do with because the leftovers aren’t quite enough for a hat or other small accessory.

I decided to use all my fancy bits of Madelinetosh Tosh Vintage and Malabrigo Yarn Rios for some scrappy, striped sweaters for my three nephews; they love bright colors and figured it was a way to get really nice, superwash merino wool garments on them!

I’m using Tin Can Knit’s Flax Sweater pattern because its so great for stripes and the garter details on the sleeves gives it a bit of interest and is a little less boring to knit than a straight stockinette stitch. Also, I’d never used this pattern before and it’s been on my list forever. Every knitter needs a few Flax sweaters in their life, right?

Here is my 3 year old nephew’s sweater in progress–he loves pink and I thought this bright pop of tosh in espadrilles would be much appreciated by him. His little brothers features blues and coppers and grays, and the oldest boy’s will be greens and maybe orange. I love how these are coming out. I tested out my color stories in my knitting journal to see if I’d like the way they looked. It’s a great way to visualize before you knit.

You can see more snaps of my knitting journal here.

How do you use up the rest of your yarn?